LIFE, HEALTH AND FOODS


The Lord will guide you continually, watering your life when you are dry and keeping you healthy, too. You will be like a well watered garden like an ever-flowing spring. Isaiah 58:11 (NLT)

“Jesus was not satisfied to attract attention to Himself merely as a wonder-worker or as a healer of physical disease. He was seeking to draw men to Him as their Saviour” MH pg. 6

September 8th, 2014


Hi everyone, today I have for you some amazingly healthy, affordable and easy to make bean recipes…… I know many of you are transitioning from eating meat to a plant based diet, so these will really keep your family taste bud excited!!! Read the article on the health benefits of beans at the end of the recipes

Blessings in the name of Jesus Christ,
Debra

 

Barbecue “Chick” Peas                                                   

           

1 lb. garbanzos, dry (approx 6 cups when cooked)

1 ½ tsp. sea salt
1 medium onion, diced
1 large carrot washed and diced
4 cloves garlic, pressed
4 medium tomatos diced (or you can use 1 cup unsweetened tomato paste)
1 Tbsp. sesame tahini
3 Tbsp. molasses + 2 Tbsp. honey
2 tsp. onion powder
2 stalk of scallion
3 Tbsp. lemon juice
2 c. water (or adjust for spaghetti sauce thickness
½ tsp. coriander
¼ tsp. sage
Herbs: parsley, basil and oregano

Directions:
Cook beans for one hour on low heat with 1 ½ tsp. sea salt added when done (let sit for a while to absorb salt). Drain beans and place in a bowl. Sauté onions, scallion, and garlic in small amount of water until soft. Blend tomatoes or tomato paste with the remaining ingredients, with part of water. Pour mixture into a baking dish with the beans and diced carrots. Pour tomato sauce over all and stir enough to coat all beans. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes. Or simmer on stove top. Serve over breadfruits, yam, Irish or sweet potato, or you can enjoy with steamed brown rice or whole wheat noodles.

 

Dinner Bean Chowder


1 lb. dry navy beans (approx 6 cups when cooked)
½ medium onion, chopped
½ c. raw cashews
4 cloves of garlic
2 stalk of scallion
¼ c. ripe sweet pepper
½ tsp. onion powder
1 Tbsp. parsley
½ tsp. basil
¼ tsp. sage
¼ tsp. thyme
¼ tsp. paprika
1 tsp. coriander
¼ cup coconut milk

Soak beans overnight and cook the next morning on low heat for about 1 ½ hours until soft. When beans are cooked, sauté onion, scallion and garlic in two tablespoons of water. Stir into beans. Measure 1 ½ c. bean/onion mix (include some of liquid) into blender with cashews. Blend until smooth; add more of liquid if necessary to blend. Return this cream sauce to the beans. Add in coconut milk, sweet pepper, herbs and remaining seasonings. Simmer for 30 minutes and serve hot over baked Irish potato, or steamed brown rice or steamed vegetables.


Home style Baked Beans

1 lb. (6 cups when cooked) dry navy beans, cooked without salt
¼ c. water
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 c. diced onions
1 c. diced bell pepper
3 ½ cup tomatoes, diced or crushed
2 tsp. sea salt
¼ c. molasses
½ c. raw honey
½ tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. dried basil
½ tsp. coriander
½ tsp. sage

Drain cooked beans and place in mixing bowl. Sauté garlic, onions, and bell pepper in two tablespoons of water. Add to beans along with remaining ingredients. Mix together well. Pour into sprayed medium size baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes covered. Uncover and bake another 30 minutes.


Beans: Protein-Rich Super foods

“High in fiber and antioxidants, beans aren't just good for the waistline, they may aid in disease prevention, too.”

By Jenny Stamos Kovacs
WebMD the Magazine

More than just a meat substitute, beans are so nutritious that the latest dietary guidelines recommend we triple our current intake from 1 to 3 cups per week. What makes beans so good for us? Here's what the experts have to say:


Chronic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease all have something in common. Being overweight increases your chances of developing them and makes your prognosis worse if you do, says Mark Brick, PhD -- which means that trimming your waistline does more for you than make your pants look better. Brick, a professor in the department of soil and crop sciences at Colorado State University, is investigating the ability of different bean varieties to prevent cancer and diabetes.


Beans are comparable to meat when it comes to calories, says Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, a registered dietitian at Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Wellness Institute in Chicago and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. But they really shine in terms of fiber and water content, two ingredients that make you feel fuller, faster. Adding beans to your diet helps cut calories without feeling deprived.


Our diets tend to be seriously skimpy when it comes to fiber, to the detriment of both our hearts and our waistlines. One cup of cooked beans provides about 12 grams of fiber -- nearly half the recommended daily dose of 21 to 25 grams per day for adult women (30 to 38 grams for adult men). Meat, on the other hand, contains no fiber at all.


This difference in fiber content means that meat is digested fairly quickly, Brick says, whereas beans are digested slowly, keeping you satisfied longer. Plus, beans are low in sugar, which prevents insulin in the bloodstream from spiking and causing hunger. When you substitute beans for meat in your diet, you get the added bonus of a decrease in saturated fat, says Blatner.

Beans have something else that meat lacks, Blatner says: phytochemicals, compounds found only in plants (phyto is Greek for "plant"). Beans are high in antioxidants, a class of phytochemicals that incapacitate cell-damaging free radicals in the body, says Brick.
(Free radicals have been implicated in everything from cancer and aging to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.)

In a U.S. Department of Agriculture study, researchers measured the antioxidant capacities of more than 100 common foods. Three types of beans made the top four: small red beans, red kidney beans, and pinto beans. And three others -- black beans, navy beans, and black-eyed peas -- achieved top-40 status.
The bottom line? Beans are pretty much the perfect food, Brick says.


Read more: http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/beans-protein-rich-superfoods


MEDICAL DISCLAIMER
The information given here is for educational purposes only. It is meant to be used as a guide towards health and does not replace the evaluation by and advice of a qualified licensed health care professional. For detailed interpretation of your health and specific conditions, consult with your physician.

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